Conisbrough & Denaby Main
Heritage Group
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On High Street there are several houses that have been there for well over a century. 
 











































Elmhurst on the 1881 census entered as 10 High Street (High Street and Church Street changed places for a few years) and occupied by Godfrey Walker a 35 years old farmer of 500 acres employing eleven men and five boys.  The stackyard for this farm was approximately where Waverley Avenue was built.  After the death of Mr Walker the house was occupied by Mr Arthur Hort Barnard, Farm Manager for the Walker Family.  By 1918 the house is the home of Mr H H Sharp and his wife and three small children age 5 years, 3 years and nine months.  Only girl Margaret Elizabeth, youngest son Charles Geoffrey.
In 1921 Mr Sharp is advertising a car for sale from Elmhurst, 5 seater, Bosch Magneto, Zenith Carburetter, years licence, owner driven, excellent condition, £100.

Elmhurst later became the home of the Sharp family, important coal dealers in Conisbro’ for some years.  Old Mr Robert Sharp lived at the Terrace, he personally planted trees around the boundary of his property with the help of his gardener/horseman Frank Sproxton, these trees are still standing in 2018.  Also still standing is the carriage shed, now a house but in 1903 Mr Sharp could smell gas, he and Frank went looking for a gas leak with a lighted match.  They did find it but in finding it they blew off several tiles from the roof of the carriage shed and both came out missing eyebrows, lucky to escape serious injury.
Mr Harold Sharp was living here during WW2 and Elmhurst became an ARP Post for the area, Mr Sharp was an ARP Warden along with Ernest Downing, these two plus an ARP Messenger operated from here.
  
Some of the old barns were demolished and a bungalow was built between ‘Elmhurst’ and ‘The White House’. 
The White House, the old address for this property was 2 Church Lane, at the time this part of the High Street as it is now known was much narrower, a track that had been worn across the old village green which is believed to have been between the Church and the land we know as The Priory. 

In the 1911 census Mr Norwood is the veterinary surgeon and he is living at The White House, High Street.
At this time this is the house between Elmhurst and the Parish Church and the address is 2 Church Lane, this part of the Road now known as High Street is much narrower, just a track that has been worn across the old village green which is believed to have been between the Church and the land later known as The Priory.   As already mentioned, Mr Norwood is a veterinary surgeon, his full name is William White Norwood and he is aged 44 years.  He is married to Emily Ann who is also 41 years old and they have been married for 16 years.  They were married in the first quarter of 1895.  Emily has had three children but only two are still alive, their names are Dorothy Mary aged 14 years and Marjorie Edith aged 12 years.  They have one servant Alice Middleton Warren who is eighteen years old and was born in Conisbro’.  In this house there are nine rooms.  Mr Norwood died 9th June 1937, still living in the same house.

His estate of £4202 14s. 0d., was shared between his two daughters, both married by the time he died.  Dorothy Mary Broad married to Gerald Herbert Broad and Marjorie Edith Palmer married to William Francis George Palmer.
Until the house was sold upon the death of Mr Godfrey Walker, the owner, Mr Norwood paid £31 per year rent.

The Stocks were on the Village Green until they were removed and later stolen, however, the stones for the stocks were recovered some years later and placed in Coronation Park.

In 1841 the widow of our longest serving vicar Rev Henry Watkins was living here, she was 85 years old.  Several of the occupants have been Mr Colley, veterinary surgeon, Mr Norwood another veterinary who paid an annual rent of £31 to Godfrey Walker until Mr Walkers’ death in 1908 when the house was sold for £450.  Since then Dr Urruty one of our Conisbro’ doctors who lived there for some years.

Sextons Cottage was a small cottage in the corner of the Church graveyard where High Street and Church Street meet.  The access to this cottage was up stone steps from High Street, this is no longer visible in the wall.  This little cottage was demolished in 1878.    The last tenant of the cottage was Charles Woolhouse, Sexton, he lived there with his wife and was described as a cordwainer as well as being Sexton.  As Sexton he was allowed pasturage for his pigs and hens in the churchyard.  We do not have a picture of any livestock in the churchyard but we do possibly have a photo of Mr Woolhouse sitting on one of the graves, looks as though he has a shovel, the photo was taken before the clock was donated to the church in 1882 by Mrs Lydia Simpson, widow of Thomas Henry Simpson owner of the local brickworks. 
 
Across the road from Elmhurst were two cottages and a shop, behind that a main house and surgery which had once been owned and lived in by Dr McClure who also owned the two houses and shop.  He shared his surgery with doctors Bell and Clark in the late 1940s but soon afterwards all the buildings were demolished and in their place two bungalows were built. 

Waverley Cottage
Richard Adolphus Rich lives at Waverley Cottage, he is aged 29 years old and is a chauffeur working for Caleb Kilner who lives across the street from Waverley Cottage.  His wife is Annie Matilda aged 32, they have been married for eight years and have had five children unfortunately two children have already died.  The children still living are Cyril aged 8 years, Fred aged 7 years and Colin Adolphus Aged 6 years.   The two younger boys were born in Conisbro’ but Cyril was born in Doncaster, all three are at school.  There are six rooms in the Rich house.

On High Street there are several houses that have been there for well over a century.  Number 1 High Street is one of these old stone built houses.  In 1908 the house is possibly occupied by Mr Richard Hanley/Handley and his family for a rental of £7 10s. per year.  However, this year things changed as in November the house was bought by Mr Hanley for £365.  It was previously owned by Mr Godfrey Walker. 
 
Elmhurst on the 1881 census entered as 10 High Street and occupied by Godfrey Walker a 35 years old farmer of 500 acres employing eleven men and five boys.  The stackyard for this farm was approximately where Waverley Avenue was built years later.  After the death of Mr Walker the house was occupied by Mr A H Barnard, Farm Manager for the Walker Family.
The house was in the occupation Mr. Barnard in 1908 who was paying rent of £35 per year, when Mr Walker died and the estate was liquidated Elmhurst was sold to Mr Sargon for £775.
Elmhurst later became the home of the Sharp family, important coal dealers in Conisbro’ for some years.  Mr Harold Sharp was living here during WW2 and the house became an ARP Post for the area, Mr Sharp was one of the ARP Wardens along with Ernest Downing, these two plus an ARP Messenger operated from here.  
Some of the old barns were demolished and a bungalow was built between ‘Elmhurst’ and ‘The White House’. 
 
The White House, the old address for this property was 2 Church Lane, at the time this part of the High Street as it is now known was much narrower, a track that had been worn across the old village green which is believed to have been between the Church and the land we know as The Priory.   In 1841 the widow of our longest serving vicar Rev Henry Watkins was living here, she was 85 years old.  Several of the occupants have been Mr Colley, veterinary surgeon, Mr William W Norwood another veterinary who paid an annual rent of £31 to Godfrey Walker until Mr Walkers’ death in 1908 when the house was sold to Mr Lowe, of Conisbro’ for £450.  Since then Dr Urruty one of our more recent Conisbro’ doctors lived there for some years.

Sextons Cottage was a small cottage in the corner of the Church graveyard where High Street and Church Street meet.  The access to this cottage was up stone steps from High Street, this is no longer visible in the wall.  This little cottage was demolished in 1878.    The last tenant of the cottage was Charles Woolhouse, Sexton, he lived there with his wife and was described as a cordwainer as well as being Sexton.  As Sexton he was allowed pasturage for his pigs and hens in the churchyard.  We do not have a picture of any livestock in the churchyard but we do possibly have a photo of Mr Woolhouse sitting on one of the graves, looks as though he has a shovel, the photo was taken before the clock was donated to the church in 1882 by Mrs Lydia Simpson, widow of Thomas Henry Simpson owner of the local brickworks. 
 
Across the road from Elmhurst were two cottages and a shop, behind that a main house and surgery which had once been owned and lived in by Dr McClure who also owned the two houses and shop.  He shared his surgery with doctors Bell and Clark in the late 1940s but soon afterwards all the buildings were demolished and in their place two bungalows were built.    
The Stocks were on the Village Green until they were removed and later stolen, however, the stones for the stocks were recovered some years later and placed in Coronation Park. 

Charles Woolhouse