Conisbrough & Denaby Main
Heritage Group

Conisbrough Fire Brigade
Researched by June & Tony Greathead


The exact date of formation of the Conisbrough Fire Brigade is not known but there are written records back to 1896, certainly in 1900 Mr William Jones, Conisbrough Blacksmith, was Captain and other members around this time were:  Sgt. Senior, Mr G Walker, Mr C Wagstaff, Mr B Gabbitas, by 1906 Mr Rogers, Mr Harrison, Mr Gregory & Mr Smith had joined and by 1908 Mr Harry Ogilwy, Mr Townsley & Mr Hudson had joined and there seems to have been no shortage of volunteers for the Fire Service.  Many of the Fire Officers were awarded medals for bravery and won cups for their performance in competitions.
The building in which the equipment was kept was more or less where Normans Hairdressers is situated today.  When the decision was taken to build a new property the fire team moved into Waverley Avenue, to the rear of Church Street.  
From newspaper cuttings we now know that Conisbrough had its own Fire Engine as early as 1846.


Chemical Fire Engine
30th December 1887
Yesterday Mr Allinson of Doncaster gave an experiment at Conisbrough with the Chemical Fire Engine 'Hero' and successfully extinguished a fire existing of 56 gallons of tar in seven seconds.  Afterwards four gallons of paraffin were added and the fire again extinguished in eight seconds.  Two tons of timber saturated with tar and paraffin were then fired and the flames were completely extinguished in one minute and thirty seconds.

  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  9. Managing Director
  10. Managing Director
  11. Managing Director
  12. Managing Director
  13. Managing Director

Local Newspaper Articles

Castle Mill Fire
8th March 1893  
At twenty minutes past ten o clock on Monday night Police Constable Parker was on his beat in the neighbourhood of the old Castle ruins when he noticed a lurid glare eastward.  He was surprised to find that it came from the Castle Saw Mills.  The officer at once hurried to the residence of the owner Mr Robert Wilson who had retired for the night, he then proceeded promptly to the house of Mr George Harrison the Captain of the Fire Brigade.  By eleven o clock all of the firemen and the fire engine were at the conflagration with the water jets playing upon the flames.   A crowd of up to one hundred persons had assembled and ample assistance was forthcoming.   At half past eleven an engine belonging to Mr George Booth of Conisbro Steam Mills (Sickle Works)  arrived and Mr Harrison superintended the manipulation of the hose.  As a result of combined exertions the fire was thoroughly under control by midnight and the flames were prevented from spreading to the water wheel and certain detached sheds which would otherwise have been destroyed.  The brigade remained at the spot until ten o clock next morning Mr Booths engine was dispensed with at four o clock.  The works were completely gutted and the total amount of damage is estimated at about £400.  The works were not insured.  The cause of the fire is unknown.


Denaby Shop Fire
26th April 1899
The Mexborough Fire Brigade were called to a fire at Denaby Main at 11.55 last night. A fire was discovered in a lock up wooden shop used by Mr George Thomas Cooke of Mexborough.  The flames rapidly spread to the next erection in the occupation of Messrs Edwards & Co drapers  which place was partially burned down.  A fried fish and chip potato shop also belonging to Cooke was pulled down to prevent the flames from spreading.  The Brigade had to get water in buckets from a tap nearby and everything was in order by 2.30am.  The shop in which the fire originated was burnt down and the windows of some of the shops further on were broken.  Considerable damage was done to stock by water and fire.  The places are insured for small amounts.                                          
Had there been a strong wind no doubt the flames would have reach St Chad's which is situate at the east end of the wooden erections.

Goodlads Butcher Shop Fire
1st October 1894
On Friday night about 10.30pm a fire broke out in a shed belonging to                 Mr Goodlad, butcher, on Church Street.  The shed is situated behind his premises  but fortunately the fire did not spread although the shed was completely destroyed and notwithstanding the efforts of the Fire Brigade who turned out promptly on the alarm being given.

New Fire Engine
9th September 1895
On Saturday the new fire engine ordered by Conisbrough Parish Council from Messrs Rose & Co of Manchester had a public welcome to the town.  The Conisbrough Fire Brigade paraded at the Station to receive the Engine and it was then drawn through the town to the Holywell Brewery where arrangements had been made to test it.  Most of the members of the Parish Council were present in addition to a large number of the public.  In the evening the dinner arranged for took place at the Red Lion Hotel when about a hundred guests were present including besides the Conisbrough Fire Brigade, members of Mexborough, Stocksbridge and Doncaster Brigades.

Haystack Fire
10th September 1883
At a stack fire at Appleyards farm the Fire Engine was found to be defective.

Goodlad Fire
5th January 1887
On Saturday night at Conisbrough a hay and clover stack belonging to Mr Richard Goodlad was found to be on fire and although an alarm was raised and assistance obtained the whole stack was completely consumed.  The cost of damage is about £80 and is covered by insurance with the Norwich Insurance Company.  It is not known how the fire originated.

Star Inn Fire
1st November 1909
A destructive fire that had a destructive sequel broke out on Sunday morning at the Star Inn,  an old Hostelry on the Sheffield to Doncaster Road.  The fire had its origin in a wooden joist beneath the fireplace in the Commercial Room.   Besides the proprietor and his wife there were in the house his child and two servants, Emily and Maggie Mountford, sisters who slept in the attic.  All inmates with the exception of the girl Maggie, aged 14 made the escape through the billiard room and down some stone steps into the yard.  Maggie took the wrong turning and went downstairs where the landlord had been so nearly overpowered and she was later found suffocated.  The firemen were successful in confining the flames to the lower part of the premises but there the damage was extraordinary the ground floor being gutted.  The damage done is estimated at £2000.

Stack Fire at Ferry Farm
18th December 1888
Last night between ten o clock and eleven o clock some persons passing the premises of Mr William Bradbury at Ferry Farm noticed a blaze in his Stackyard which is near the road.  On getting nearer it was found that two stacks one consisting of wheat and the other of oats were on fire.  Alarm was given and on the ringing of the Church Bell soon brought numbers to the place.   The Conisbrough Fire Brigade under Captain George Harrison were soon on the spot and its efforts were put into saving several other stacks close by.  This was effective and the fire confined to the two stacks already mentioned which were totally destroyed.  The stacks were insured to their value in the Queen Fire Office.  This is the sixth stack fire in Conisbrough during the last two years the last one being at Carr Grange Farm on the 6th November.  It is generally thought that they have all been the work of an incendiary (arsonist)  and last night's fire strongly bears out that opinion.  Sgt Simpson had passed only a few minutes before and seen nothing.

26th April 1899
Fire at Denaby near St Chads
The Mexborough Fire Brigade were called to a fire at Denaby Main at 11.55 last night.   A fire was discovered in a lock up wooden shop used by Mr George Thomas Cooke of Mexborough.  The flames rapidly spread to the next erection in the occupation of Messrs Edwards & Co drapers  which place was partially burned down.   A fried fish and chip potato shop also belonging to Cooke was pulled down to prevent the flames from spreading.  The Brigade had to get water in buckets from a tap nearby and everything was in order by 2.30am.  The shop in which the fire originated was burnt down and the windows of some of the shops further on were broken.  Considerable damage was done to stock by water and fire.  The places are insured for small amounts.  Had there been a strong wind no doubt the flames would have reached St Chads  which is situate at the east end of the wooden erections.


4th October 1845
Another fire at Conisbrough
We are sorry to state that another fire took place at Conisbrough on Wednesday night 24th September on the farm of Mr John Goodlad.  At about eight o clock that night a wagon load of wheat, a stack of straw and a shed near to the farm were discovered to be on fire and but for the timely exertions of the owner, his assistants and other inhabitants the whole of the farm buildings, six stacks and a barn filled with corn would have been burnt to the ground.  Happily the flames were subdued before they had extended further than where first discovered.  
We regret to add that there is strong reason to suspect that the fire was caused by an incendiary (arsonist).   The above having happened in so short a time after a similar occurrence in the same village the greatest alarm and excitement have been produced in the neighbourhood and in order to be better provided against such wicked and detestable acts Mr Joshua Wigfull, miller and corn merchant has succeeded in collecting among his neighbours nearly £100 for the purchase of a fire engine.  Unfortunately no clue has yet been discovered to lead to the detection of the offender.

12th September 1846  
FIRE ENGINE
A little alarm was created among the company at an Inn in Conisbrough the other day.  During the time the new fire engine lately purchased by some of the principal inhabitants was being exercised.  Much doubt having being expressed by the landlady of the house as to the capability of the engine throwing water sufficiently high to reach the roof of her husband's dwelling.  The hose was immediately directed to that quarter and the stream being discharged in a large body much in the style of a rocket in its decent it chanced to find its way down a chimney of a room where a party was enjoying their 'potations' (no idea what that means).  It is perhaps needless to say that the unexpected visitation of water, soot and steam created no trifling consternation among the company who made themselves as scarce as circumstances would allow.  Nor was their wanted equanimity of ease recovered till  the cause of their fright was explained by the waggish Timbobbins at the outside.  

24th June 1874
About nine o clock on Saturday night a large wooden bridge on the high road between Denaby and Mexborough crossing the River Don near to Denaby Main was observed to be on fire.  Two colliers of Conisbrough named Charles Russell and George Wood made the discovery and immediately gave the alarm.  one end of the bridge nearest the colliery was soon engulfed in flames and all efforts to stop the fire failed.  The bridge was entirely consumed and damage is estimated at £560.  The fire is supposed to have originated in a rubbish heap in the yard of Denaby Main that has been burning for several weeks past within a few yards of the bridge.  A temporary structure is being thrown across for present accommodation.

17th May 1880
On Saturday a little boy was charged on remand with setting fire to a haystack.  The Saturday before a companion of the accused bought some matches with a half penny his mother had given him and the matches he divided amongst his playmates.  The group went to a field in which there was a barn and close to the barn a haystack.  The boy made two fires with grass  inside the barn but his friends quickly put them out.  The boy then went out of the barn and soon afterwards the haystack was on fire.  Part of the stack was badly burned causing damage to the cost of £10. The boy pleaded guilty and was imprisoned for forty eight hours and was to be given six lashes with a Birch Rod.

10th September 1883
At a stack fire at Appleyards farm the Fire Engine was found to be defective.  

5th January 1887
Goodlad
On Saturday night at Conisbrough a hay and clover stack belonging to Mr Richard Goodlad was found to be on fire and although an alarm was raised and assistance obtained the whole stack was completely consumed.  The cost of damage is about £80 and is covered by insurance with the Norwich Insurance Company.  It is not known how the fire originated.

12 December 1887
Late on Saturday night an extensive stack fire broke out on the farm premises of Mr George Stacey, Doncaster Road, by which three stacks, Clover, Straw and Barley were totally destroyed and the farm buildings and three other stacks closely adjoining were greatly endangered.  In less than an hour the fire had assumed large proportions and the whole countryside was lighted up.  Two other stacks soon became ignited and the villagers turned out en masse to view the burning fodder.  Fortunately the wind blew away from the house.  Four other stacks escaped and the house got off scot free. The parish fire engine and a private fire engine belonging to Mr Thomas Booth were brought into requisition but in consequence of shortness of water they could perform but very light service.  The firemen were instrumental in saving those stacks which had not become ignited by spreading over them tarpaulin and directing their energies towards confining the flames to a small area.  The damage is estimated at approaching £200.  The supposition is that the fire was the outcome of a case of incendiarism - this is the third stack fire in Conisbrough in the past year each of them first becoming noticeable at around ten o clock in the evening.

30th December 1887
Yesterday Mr Allinson of Doncaster gave an experiment at Conisbrough with the Chemical Fire Engine 'Hero' and successfully extinguished a fire existing of 56 gallons of tar in seven seconds.  Afterwards for gallons of paraffin were added and the fire again extinguished in eight seconds.  Two tons of timber saturated with tar and paraffin were then fired and the flames were completely extinguished in one minute and thirty seconds.

18th December 1888
Last night between ten o clock and eleven o clock some persons passing the premises of Mr William Bradbury at Ferry Farm noticed a blaze in his Stackyard which is near the road.  On getting nearer it was found that two stacks one consisting of wheat and the other of oats were on fire.  Alarm was given and on the ringing of the Church Bell soon brought numbers to the place.   The Conisbrough Fire Brigade under Captain George Harrison were soon on the spot and its efforts were put into saving several other stacks close by.  This was effective and the fire confined to the two stacks already mentioned which were totally destroyed.  The stacks were insured to their value in the Queen Fire Office.  This is the sixth stack fire in Conisbrough during the last two years the last one being at Carr Grange Farm on the 6th November.  It is generally thought that they have all been the work of an incendiary (arsonist)  and last night's fire strongly bears out that opinion.  Sgt Simpson had passed only a few minutes before.  

8th March 1893    Castle Mill Fire
At twenty minutes past ten o clock on Monday night Police Constable Parker was on his beat in the neighbourhood of the old Castle ruins when he noticed a lurid glare eastward.  He was surprised to find that it came from the Castle Saw Mills.  The officer at once hurried to the residence of the owner Mr Robert Wilson who had retired for the night, he then proceeded promptly to the house of Mr George Harrison the Captain of the Fire Brigade.  By eleven o clock all of the firemen and the fire engine were at the conflagration with the water jets playing upon the flames. A crowd of up to one hundred persons had assembled and ample assistance was forthcoming.   At half past eleven an engine belonging to Mr George Booth of Conisbro Steam Mills (Sickle Works)  arrived and Mr Harrison superintended the manipulation of the hose.  As a result of combined exertions the fire was thoroughly under control by midnight and the flames were prevented from spreading to the water wheel and certain detached sheds which would otherwise have been destroyed.  The brigade remained at the spot until ten o clock next morning Mr Booths engine was dispensed with at four o clock.  The works were completely gutted and the total amount of damage is estimated at about £400.  The works were not insured.  The cause of the fire is unknown.

1st October 1894
Goodlad
On Friday night about 10.30pm a fire broke out in a shed belonging to Mr Goodlad, butcher, on Church Street.  The shed is situated behind his premises  but fortunately the fire did not spread although the shed was completely destroyed and notwithstanding the efforts of the Fire Brigade who turned out promptly on the alarm being given.

9th September 1895
On Saturday the new fire engine ordered by Conisbrough Parish Council from Messrs Rose & Co of Manchester had a public welcome to the town.  The Conisbrough Fire Brigade paraded at the Station to receive the Engine and it was then drawn through the town to the Holywell Brewery where arrangements had been made to test it.  Most of the members of the Parish Council were present in addition to a large number of the public.  In the evening the dinner arranged for took place at the Red Lion Hotel when about a hundred guests were present including besides the Conisbrough Fire Brigade, members of Mexborough, Stocksbridge and Doncaster Brigades.  

26th April 1899
The Mexborough Fire Brigade were called to a fire at Denaby Main at 11.55 last night. A fire was discovered in a lock up wooden shop used by Mr George Thomas Cooke of Mexborough.  The flames rapidly spread to the next erection in the occupation of Messrs Edwards & Co drapers  which place was partially burned down.  A fried fish and chip potato shop also belonging to Cooke was pulled down to prevent the flames from spreading.  The Brigade had to get water in buckets from a tap nearby and everything was in order by 2.30am.  The shop in which the fire originated was burnt down and the windows of some of the shops further on were broken.  Considerable damage was done to stock by water and fire.  The places are insured for small amounts.     
Had there been a strong wind no doubt the flames would have reach St Chad's which is situate at the east end of the wooden erections.



9th July 1901
At an ordinary meeting of the council last night the Captain of the Fire Brigade requested that new uniforms should be found for the men.  At the recent competition at Rotherham although his Brigade won the Yorkshire Fire Brigades Association Shield he felt ashamed to hear the remarks passed by spectators about clothing.  It was decided to inspect the uniforms.

9th January 1903
A fire broke out at the Wesleyan Chapel in Conisbrough last night.  In one of the vestries a fire had been kindled for an evening service and some sparks must have fallen out of the grate and ignited the carpet.  Within a very short time the Conisbrough Fire Brigade was present and averted what could otherwise have been a disastrous affair.  As it was practically the whole of the lower part of the premises was destroyed.  Two of the firemen, Saville and Sargentson were overcome by the fumes and had to be carried out of the burning building by their comrades.  Saville is in a critical condition as the result of his experience.

1st November 1909
A destructive fire that had a destructive sequel broke out on Sunday morning at the Star Inn,  an old Hostelry on the Sheffield to Doncaster Road.  The fire had its origin in a wooden joist beneath the fireplace in the Commercial Room.   Besides the proprietor and his wife there were in the house his child and two servants, Emily and Maggie Mountford, sisters who slept in the attic.  All inmates with the exception of the girl Maggie, aged 14 made the escape through the billiard room and down some stone steps into the yard.  Maggie took the wrong turning and went downstairs where the landlord had been so nearly overpowered and she was later found suffocated.  The firemen were successful in confining the flames to the lower part of the premises but there the damage was extraordinary the ground floor being gutted.
The damage done is estimated at £2000.



                                                                                         Crime & Punishment

10th January 1863
George Pearson 32, Christopher Hendy 26, George Wilkinson, 26, all glassblowers and George Webster 30, labourer were indicted for stealing four fowls and two pieces of chain belonging to John Blyth of Conisbrough on 16th December. Wilkinson pleaded guilty and the other prisoners were found guilty by the jury.  
Pearson was sentenced to six month hard labour, Hendy and Wilkinson nine months and Webster who had been previously convicted twelve months.

Sheffield Independent      22nd June 1872
A sleepy Carter, James Harvey a carter in the employ of Messrs Hudson & Nephew Millers of Conisbrough was summoned for neglecting to have proper control of a horse of which he was the driver at West Melton.  Fined 5shillings and costs or in default 14 day imprisonment.

7th September 1874
Richard Rotherham a well to do farmer and landowner of Conisbro was charged with stealing five bundles of thatch the property of Mr T Simpson.  Mr Hudson was passing Mr Simpsons field when he saw Rotherham fetch the straw and throw it over a hedge into a cart that was waiting.  His defence was that the straw was only borrowed.  He went to prison for three months.

14th June 1875
Four colliers at Conisbrough named George Jepson, Thomas Sissons, John White, Edward Watkins were charged with wilful damage to land in the Castle Grounds. On 3rd June the named and several others were seen playing cricket, the complainant, Mr Hudson who rents the eatage (the right to graze his cows).  No one paid to go into the Castle Grounds and formerly no one paid to go into the Castle or at least they paid what they wanted, but now a penny each was demanded.  How this came about was that some years ago a Beerhouse keeper offered and obtained the key by paying £10.  The Bench dismissed the case on the grounds that no damage could be proved.  

19th July 1875
Joseph Baxter was fined 16s 6d and costs for damaging growing grass whilst seeking mushrooms.

7th February 1876
Alice Smith was charged by Mary Ann Brazier both of Conisbrough with an assault.  On Friday the parties quarrelled as to the stoops where they fasten their clothes lines and Brazier alleged that Smith assaulted her.  Smith was fined  one shilling.

28th February 1880
Ferry Farm
At Court on Wednesday, W Smith and W Whittam two labourers belonging to Conisbrough were charged with stealing three stones of Barley Chaff and two stones of linseed cake from Mrs Hudson of the Ferry Farm.  Smith said that he had the sanction of Mrs Hudsons manager to fetch the Chaff and seeing the cake he put a little in the bag.  Whittam and Smith told the court that the manager said they might have the Chaff and told him to help himself.    Both prisoners were committed to trial.  

17th May 1880
On Saturday a little boy named Joseph Warren was charged on remand with setting fire to a haystack.  The Saturday before a companion of  the accused bought some matches with a half penny his mother had given him and the matches he divided amongst his playmates.  The group went to a field in which there was a barn and close to the barn a haystack.  The boy made two fires with grass  inside the barn but his friends quickly put them out.  The boy then went out of the barn and soon afterwards the haystack was on fire.  Part of the stack was badly burned causing damage to the cost of £10.  Warren, the boy pleaded guilty and was imprisoned for forty eight hours and was to be given six lashes with a Birch Rod.

26th October 1881
At the West Riding Court yesterday Thomas Crabtree of Conisbrough was remanded on the charge of stealing eight sheep, the property of Mr Godfrey Walker. It was alleged that the prisoner stole the sheep from Mr Walker, sold them to his brother and then stole the same sheep a second time.

15th October 1883
Joseph Appleyard was fined 20s and 9s 9d costs for allowing a large quantity of stone and sand to stand on the highway at Conisbro, causing an obstruction.  

3rd April 1884
Charles Balmforth Innkeeper was fined 1 shiiling and costs of 12s 6d for allowing drunkenness.
Frank and William Appleyard were each fined 25 shillings including costs for keeping dogs without licences.

23 June 1884
Thomas Thompson of Conisbro was ordered to pay 24 shillings damages and costs for absenting himself from the employ of Mr Barrow Glass and Bottle Maker of Conisbro.  Thompson had been speaking at a temperance meeting in Doncaster when he should have been at work.
19th September 1885
Robert Cooper a Sicklesmith of Conisbro was fined one shilling and ordered to pay tuppence damage and fifteen shillings costs for damaging grass at Conisbro, he was looking for mushrooms.

17th July 1888
Samuel Bell, glassblower and William Lidster, collier were charged with damaging a fence in Denaby on the 8th July.  Early in the morning they were observed gathering mushrooms.  On seeing they were observed they made off breaking down the fence.  Each was fined 12s 6d. and costs.
2nd August 1888
Joseph Hudson a collier from Swinton was charged for wilful damage to a garden in Conisbro - he was pulling up radishes.  Sent to prison for two months.

6th August 1888
Robert Cooper a labourer from Conisbro charged for wilfully damaging mowing grass on 23rd July while searching for mushrooms.  He was fined 21s. 6d.

17th June 1889
Albert Gandy, Ernest Spencer and Alfred Coulson, boys from Conisbrough, were fined 11s 6d for stealing gooseberries.

30th May 1892
Isaac Share of Conisbro was fined for having a dog without a muzzle at large on the 21st May, he was ordered to pay costs.

17th October 1892
According to evidence given some dozen men were seen on the 9th October in the fields of Mr F Appleyard.  They had dogs and were searching for game.  Mr Appleyards sons went after them, one on horseback, having been caught they denied looking for game they were seeking mushrooms.  They also stated that the Appleyards were very violent against them.   

2nd January 1893
Henry Bond labourer of Conisbro for allowing his dog to be at large without a muzzle was fined 12s 6d.
William Lawson miner for having his chimney on fire was fined 20s including costs.
George Hudson miner, for failing to quit the Alma Inn when requested fined 30s.

12th February 1894
Joseph Kelly a glass hand from Sheffield was charged with stealing a pair of boots and stockings belonging to Mary Helen Harrop of Conisbrough on 8th February. Kelly had stayed at the Harrops house one night and decamped with the boots and stockings next morning.  
Kelly, a lad, was ordered to have six strokes with a birch rod.

3rd September 1894
William Holt and John Grindle both lads belonging to Conisbro were charged with stealing apples in Conisbro on the 26th August.  The lads were seen throwing stones at apples and another boy was standing underneath the tree picking up the apples. Both lads were ordered to pay 10s. 6d. each.

10th June 1895
John Parkin a labourer from Levitt Hagg was summoned for stealing a pint pot  of the value of 6d., belonging to the Landlord of the Star Inn Conisbro, whilst the worse for drink.
He was sentenced to three days imprisonment.

9th July 1895
Maria Jarvis of Conisbro was charged with stealing a peggy tub the property of Timothy Smith.  Jarvis had lent Smith some furniture.  At three o clock on the morning of the 27th Jarvis roused Smith demanding that she have her furniture back.  They were returned but on leaving Jarvis picked up a peggy tub at the door. Jarvis said that the tub was hers but she has returned it.  The Magistrate dismissed the case.

4th April 1896
James Dickinson a shopkeeper of Conisbrough  has been fined £3 at Doncaster for keeping a gaming house.  Boys and young men assembled  at Dickinsons house and played cards.   The losers paid a penny each and the winners received tickets  which they exchanged for fish, chips and oranges.

28th September 1896
Leonard Lawcock postmaster at Conisbrough was charged with selling fireworks to a child and also exposing fireworks for sale.  A boy named Harold Moody said that Mr Lawcocks daughter sold him one halfpenny worth of fireworks and a boy named Haigh corroborated.  Mr Lawcock called his daughter who denied that she had sold the fireworks to the boys in question but that she had sold some to a boy named Bartholomew.  On the 21st Sgt Brown went into the shop of Mr Lawcock  and found a bottle full of fireworks in the window but the bottle had a stopper on .  On the counter was a wood case with a glass top containing  13 boxes of chinese crackers and  fireworks and under the counter was a tin with 52 packets of fireworks, there was no lid on the case.  Mr Lawcock was told to acquaint himself with the regulations.
Arthur Moody was fined ten shillings and Charles Haigh six shillings and sixpence for discharging fireworks on the highway.

21st December 1896
George Alfred Moore a youth of New Conisbrough was charged with stealing coal. The Monday before P C Evans spotted Moore coming from Denaby Colliery, he had a lump of coal under his arm and also a bag with coal in it.  Upon seeing PC Evans the youth dropped the bag and ran home. It was ordered that he should receive four strokes with the birch rod.

3rd September 1900
Alfred Lee of Conisbrough was fined 20 shillings for stealing mushrooms, Patrick Byrne of Conisbrough and George Thacker and Alfred Sinfield were fined 17s. 6d for stealing apples.

7th January 1901
On Saturday, Albert Frost a miner was summoned for stealing fowls belonging to Martha Grindle at Conisbrough.  On the evening of 31st December Martha Grindle had put her fowls into the garden, 18 in one shed  and two in another.  Next morning two fowls were gone and there were feathers strewn around.  Next day Sgt Brown brought a pair of boots to the garden and making a footprint found that this was the same impression as had been there the day before.  After Sgt Brown had seen the damage to the chicken house he went to the prisoners home and found one fowl in the stew pot and a chicken wing on the table.  In defence of Albert Frost, Albert Cocksedge told the court that he had sold the fowl to Frost.  Frost was committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

5th February 1902
A girl named Emma of Conisbrough was charged with stealing two rings and a brooch belonging to Lucilla Ann Allport Postmistress and bound over to come up for judgement when called to do so.

15th July 1907
On Saturday at the West Riding Police Court in Doncaster the Landlord of the Castle Inn was ordered to pay the costs of 10s 6d for having been drunk in charge of a horse in Doncaster.

Pigeon stealing at Conisbro
Today three boys from Denaby named respectively Arthur Severn   Fred Stoves Ernest Marriott  were charged with stealing eight pigeons from the Station Hotel Conisbrough.   The pigeon cote had been forced open and the birds were flying about.  Police Constable Lancaster  saw the boys near the cote and each defendant admitted taking a bird.  Stoves took him to a hut in a field where the birds were found.
Defendents were remanded.