Conisbrough & Denaby Main
Heritage Group
 
DUFTONS ROW
researched by Tony Greathead

 
The area around Duftons Row is called Burcroft and until sometime early in the 1950s was subject to almost annual flooding during the winter and early spring.  Alterations to the River Don at Bentley relieved the pressure on the river in this area.

The earliest records of the site is of a man called John Wainwright who had the lane called Dodson Close or Lesser Croft with two cottages here in 1800.  The two stone cottages at the end of Duftons Row closest to the river could be the two stone cottages that Walkers Cannon Makers describe in their records (Rotherham Archives) as having been built in 1776.


Duftons Row goes back to about 1855 when in his Will, William Dearden who died in 1861 describes the row of sixteen houses which he had built in brick (most likely from the small brickyard that was in the Castle Plantation and owned by a Mrs Smith).
In 1893 Mr Benjamin Garret Dufton was granted planning permission to build a shop and dwelling house on the end of the row of houses furthest from the river.  This house was much larger than those terraced houses.  In 1914 the row of houses were purchased by Joseph Dufton, son of Benjamin and from that time it was known as Duftons Row.


In 1937 the two old stone cottages were demolished and the residents re housed.  In 1955 the whole row of occupants were re housed, mostly in Windmill Avenue, this included the Dufton family who had a shop there.


New houses were built behind where Duftons Row stood but they are still liable to flooding.


Pictured standing outside of his front door sometime in the nineteen twenties or thirties is Mr Godfrey taking a moments' pause from trying to clear the flood water from his home.  Another person also identifiable is Mrs Preston standing with a group of residents at the rear of view.

Note the tin bath kept on the wall outside the home thus making more room inside until it was required.  Bathing was taken usually in front  of the kitchen or living room fire with the family having to bath in order.

 
The area around Duftons Row is called Burcroft and until sometime in the early 1950s was subject to almost annual flooding late winter or early spring.  Alterations to the river at Bentley relieved the pressure on the River Don in this area and it is now generally flood free.

 
Duftons Row goes back to about 1855 when in his will William Dearden who died in 1861 describes the row of sixteen houses which he had built in brick which would have come from the brickyard adjoining the Castle and in the ownership of a family named Smith (this brickyard ceased trading in the 1860s).


The earliest records of the Duftons Row site is of a man called John Wainwright who had the land called Dodson close or Lesser Croft with two cottages here in 1800.   Two stone cottages at the rear of Duftons Row could have been the two cottages that Walkers of Rotherham Canon Makers describe in their records as having been built in 1776 (Rotherham Archives) the whole of this land stretched from the River Don to a point at the bottom of Windgate Hill.
The land was halved in 1871-72 with the half nearest Windgate Hill being bought by the Conisbrough Gas company first Manager Mr Charles Ledger of Doncaster, whilst the other half was bought by a man called Mr John Betney for £701, purchasing from a man called Harrop.  In 1883  the executors of Mr Betney who died in 1881 put the land up for auction on 11th May at the Red Lion Inn, described it as sixteen houses, fourteen occupied and two unoccupied with an income of £117 13s. 0d per annum. Bidding started at £600 and reached £1095. , the executors withdrew the property as it had not reached its reserve price.  Clearly at this time there is no mention of a shop which became such a feature of this row.  However, in the 1881 census Benjamin Dufton aged 46 years who was an out of work blacksmith lived here and also his son Joseph and unemployed sickle maker.
The executors of John Betney seem to have come to some arrangement with a man called William Gladwin over the property.  In 1893 Mr Benjamin Garrett Dufton was granted planning permission to build a shop and dwelling house on the end of the row of existing houses.  This new development differed from the other adjoining properties in as much that it had a Welsh slate roof as opposed to a clay pantile roof and was built crossways to the other buildings.   The enterprise appears to have flourished for in 1914 evidence of Joseph Dufton son of Benjamin Garret Dufton purchased the rest of the row.


In 1937 the stone cottages were demolished and the residents re housed Mrs Preston who went to live in Claremont Terrace in Holywell Lane.   In 1955 the other residents were re housed mainly in the new development in Windmill Avenue.  This included the members of the Dufton family who still owned and ran the shop.  The Duftons moved into a shop on Windmill retiring from business in 1960.

 
Duftons Row is now demolished and new houses built just behind where they once stood.  Flooding for some of the houses is still a problem as in 2007 when water once again entered houses on what is now called Duftons Court.




Extracts from the South Yorkshire Times

5th February 1942
The proprietors of the Denaby Empire gave a 'Talkie' show on Sunday evening in aid of the Burcroft Flood disaster fund and the staff gave their services free, a total of £18. 12s. was handed over.

22nd March 1947
Nine families have been evacuated to the Church Hall taking with them only basic essentials, no ration books and no change of clothes, leaving behind the Dufton Family who are living in upper rooms.  The counter of their shop was submerged before evacuation was thought necessary.   A rowing boat loaned by Doncaster Corporation brought food to the stranded family.



Duftons Row
The area around Duftons Row is called Burcroft and until sometime early in the 1950s was subject to almost annual flooding during the winter and early spring.  Alterations to the River Don at Bentley relieved the pressure on the river in this area.
The earliest records of the site is of a man called John Wainwright who had the lane called Dodson Close or Lesser Croft with two cottages here in 1800.  The two stone cottages at the end of Duftons Row closest to the river could be the two stone cottages that Walkers Cannon Makers describe in their records (Rotherham Archives) as having been built in 1776.
Duftons Row goes back to about 1855 when in his Will, William Dearden who died in 1861 describes the row of sixteen houses which he had built in brick (most likely from the small brickyard that was in the Castle Plantation and owned by a Mrs Elizabeth Smith).
In 1893 Mr Benjamin Garret Dufton was granted planning permission to build a shop and dwelling house on the end of the row of houses furthest from the river.  This house was much larger than the terraced houses.  In 1914 the row of houses were purchased by Joseph Dufton, son of Benjamin and from that time it was known as Duftons Row.
In 1937 the two old stone cottages were demolished and the residents re housed.  In 1955 the whole row of brick built Duftons Row was demolished and its occupants were re housed, mostly in Windmill Avenue, this included the Dufton family who opened another shop there.
Maybe you remember Miss Dufton, teacher at Station Road School, she lived with her parents in the shop at Duftons Row.
New houses were built behind where Duftons Row stood but they are still liable to flooding.